CatSynth Pic: White Cat and Modcan Modular

Our white feline friend returns, sitting atop a large Modcan modular system as streaks of sunlight enter the room.

Submitted by our friend Davor Gazde via our Facebook page.

CatSynth Pic: Sequential Prophet 6 Desktop

Cat showing off a Sequential Prophet 6.  By maxeredussence on Instagram.

We at CatSynth are a bit envious of this kitty, as we covet the Prophet 6 (and the Rev 2).  I love my Prophet 12, but these are completely different instruments and complement one another.  You can read our NAMM 2015 review of the Prophet 6 here.

New CatSynth TV: Hidden Sub Phatty

We have a brand-new CatSynth TV!  This one demonstrates a couple of the hidden features of the Moog Sub Phatty synthesizer.

In particular, we look at filter-topology selection and Oscillator 2 beat frequencies.  The filter selection makes the instrument much more powerful, moving between the extra crunchy 1 and 2-pole filters to the smooth 4-pole that is “quintessentially Moog”.  The beat frequency is a bit more esoteric – it maintains beating frequencies across different pitches, leading to some odd detunings in different registers.  But it can add a new timbral-metric component to compositions – something to explore in more depth.

We also look at the Editor/Librarian software from Moog, which is really handy for accessing these features as well as saving patches.

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CatSynth Pic: Cat and Moog Sub 37

It seems like it is a week for Cats on Moogs, and in particular cats on Moog Sub 37.  From Drew Millar via the Facebook group Synthesizer Freaks – part of the same thread that included Monday’s Cat-on-Sub-37 photo.

CatSynth Pic: Moggie on the Moogie

Moggie on the Moogie

This “moggie” has found a nice warm resting place atop this Moog synthesizer.  From Campbell Dye via Facebook.

We’re pretty sure the Moog in question is a Subsequent 37 😺 [CORRECTION:  It’s just a “plain old Sub 37”.  They do look alike.]

Passover Synth Jam with the Matzoh Man

The Matzoh Man returns for Passover on CatSynth TV, this time accompanied by a Minimoog, Roland VP-03 vocoder and our trusty Nord Stage EX.

The Dayenu song is a tradition on Passover.  The word dayenu approximately translates to “it would have been sufficient” and is used as a phrase of gratitude for each of the miracles recounted in the Passover Hagaddah.

Chag Pesach Sameach!

CatSynth Pic: Carmen and Moog DFAM Again

Carmen returns with her Moog DFAM (Drummer from another Mother), courtesy of Julia More, aka The Synth Witch.  And yes, this is clearly her DFAM 😸

You can all of Carmen’s appearances on CatSynth via this link.

CatSynth Pic: Cat and “Blue-Eyed” Korg Polysix

We recently found this pic featuring a cute cat and a Korg Polysix on matrixsynth.

Cat and Korg Polysix

More from the matrixsynth post, where you can also see more photos:

via this auction

“Sadly, something has to give. Too much kit in my life!

This is a 1982 Korg Polysix in excellent condition. It’s been fully restored within the past two years, and is in really good cosmetic condition. If you’re looking here, you know the specifications already, so no need for copypasta here.

Work done:

Old NiCad battery replaced with a brand-new NiMH battery. Not a lithium cell. The CPU card was blissfully unharmed by the usual battery leak problems that these get – check the photos.
The power supply transformer has been replaced with a super quiet, efficient toroidal unit, capable of running at 220V as well as 110V.
One VCF chip – an SSM2044 – was replaced with a brand-new old stock item.
Synth was completely recalibrated and tuned and is working perfectly.
A Tauntek MIDI input board was fitted. This really enhances the machine by allowing MIDI note in, as well as syncing the arpeggiator clock over MIDI.

Yes, I changed out the LEDs for blue ones, while replacing some scratchy, worn pots. Series resistors were recalculated to dial back the intensity. It’s not as piercing as in the photos. Will take some more pics soon. I think they really match the panel decals well, by YMMV. I’m happy to change them back to generic red (or anything, really) for the lucky buyer.”

No, it does not appear that the cat is included.

Additionally, there is a sample of a bass line played on this synth.

“A rather familiar bass-line. I’m just testing a newly-repaired Korg Polysix. This is playing in unison mode, although with only five ganged voices. No effects other than a small amount of reverb.”

When I went synth shopping for the first time in the mid 1980s (right after a birthday), among the first I encountered was one of this instrument’s more modest successors, the Korg Poly 800 II. The Polysix was long gone from the catalogs by then, and it was the time when digital synths were eclipsing analog instruments. I was quickly pulled in the direction of the Yamaha synths that dominated that era.

CatSynth Pic: Carmen and Moog DFAM

Carmen and Moog DFAM

Carmen is eager to try out the new Moog DFAM (“Drummer From Another Mother”).  We would love to try one out, too 😻

From our friend and fellow traveler Julia More, aka The Synth Witch.

You can see Carmen’s previous appearance here.

CatSynth Pic: Miep and Roland JX8P

Miep returns to CatSynth, this time with a Roland JX-8P.   You can see some of Miep’s previous appearances via this tag.

The JX-8P was a follow-up to Roland’s popular JX-3P. Some more info on it from Vintage Synth Explorer:

Though it is far more advanced than its predecessor, the JX-3P, the JX-8P has its drawbacks. Hands-on programming is sacrificed and reduced to assigning the parameter you want to tweak to a data-slider near the pitch/mod bender. Enter the PG-800 controller which gives you total control of all the JX-8P’s editable parameters with hands-on traditional slider control. Membrane buttons dominate the front panel of the JX-8P providing access to the various preset and user patches and to page through and assign editable parameters.