Wordless Wednesday: Windmill (Golden Gate Park)

Murphy Windmill, Golden Gate Park

The Murphy Windmill in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco.

You can find out more about the windmill and its history at outsidelands.org

Wordless Wednesday: Point Morris, Bronx

Point Morris, Bronx, street under train tracks

Underneath train tracks in the Point Morris section of the Bronx.  You can see a different rendering of the scene in this earlier post.

Wordless Wednesday: Under the Freeway (San Francisco)

Walking underneath the I-280 elevated structures in Mission Bay, San Francisco.

Wordless Wednesday: Tempest (without a Teapot)

Tempest on Mary Street in San Francisco

Mary Street, a small alley in the South of Market neighborhood of San Francisco. Tempest is a local bar visible in the middle of the image. More in the comments section.

Wordless Wednesday: South Bronx Train Overpass

South Bronx Train Overpass

Wordless Wednesday returns! Today we have a photo from our recent excursion in the South Bronx.

Wordless Wednesday: Cymbal

Cymbal at CatSynth HQ

Please view the comments for more detail on this photo.

Wordless Wednesday: Twin Peaks from Potrero Hill

Twin Peaks, seen from Potrero Hill

Twin Peaks in San Francisco, as seen from the west slope of Potrero Hill. Shot with Hipstamatic on an iPhone 7.

This Wordless Wednesday also makes Yom Kippur. For those who observe with us, G’mar Hatimah Tovah!

Wordless Wednesday: Afternoon on the Central Waterfront (San Francisco)

ATWater tavern, Central Waterfront, San Francisco

Taking a break from things at the ATwater Tavern along the Central Waterfront in San Francisco, not far from the industrial waterfront we love.

Wordless Wednesday: I-80 and US 101, San Francisco

I-80 and US 101 in San Francisco

California Highways 47 and 103, and the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach

At the southern edge of Los Angeles County lies the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, the two largest and busiest in the United States. They are in some ways an entire separate city, with their own network of bridges and freeways beyond the regular network of Los Angeles and its environs.

California 103We begin our exploration in a quiet and somewhat industrial section of Long Beach along Willow Road. Seemingly in the middle of nowhere, we encounter the northern California Highway 103, the Terminal Island Freeway which is a major truck route to the port. It might be the heavy truck traffic that accounts for its being in rather poor shape.

CA 103 Northern Terminus

CA_47Heading south on CA 103, we pass through a flat, industrial landscape. It is a bit desolate, but beautiful in its way. There are only two interchanges, one of which is with CA 1. Continuing past the interchanges, the freeway transitions to California Highway 47 and crosses the Cerritos Channel to Terminal Island the ports on the Commodore Schuyler F. Heim Bridge. This is a massive lift bridge that can accommodate large ships accessing the port.

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It has an old industrial and dystopian feel to its architecture, particularly on the foggy morning when I visited. Since then, the bridge has been decommissioned and is in the process of being replaced.

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I left the freeway at New Dock Street to get a closer look and to take more photos of the bridge and other details of the ports. Photographing around the working port has its challenges with a great many areas fenced off, and a no doubt a heightened suspicion of odd people wandering around with cameras. I did get a few, some of which are shared here. They have also appeared in Wordless Wednesday posts (and will continue to do so).

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CA 47 turns onto the Seaside Freeway runs east-west and bisects Terminal Island. Heading east, the freeway (also known as Ocean Boulevard) the graceful Gerald Desmond Bridge, becoming I-710 heading north through Long Beach.

Gerald Desmond Bridge

You can read about our separate adventure along I-710 is this article.

Following CA 47 west along the freeway, one winds up and down between elevated and surface sections before ascending to the photogenic Vincent Thomas Bridge.

Vincent Thomas Bridge

Vincent Thomas Bridge

There is a small park on the west side of the bridge, which affords one a change to get out, walk, and view both the bridge and the channel. There are families and others here, many probably from the adjacent community of San Pedro. We have in an instant left the industrial landscape of the port and entered the residential landscape of greater Los Angeles. It is appropriate the CA 47 ends here and the freeway turns north as I-110, the Harbor Freeway. But that is a story for another time.