Cleo with Korg Rhythm 55, Roland SH-101, Arturia

Cleo the cat naps next to a Korg Rhythm 55 drum machine.  Above is a Roland SH-101 synthesizer and arturia keyboard.

Cleo naps next to a Korg Rhythm 55 vintage drum machine, while keeping a wary eye open. Behind her are a Roland SH-101 and an Arturia keyboard. Submitted by hotham sound via Twitter.

Cleo, the one and only.

We at CatSynth are quite happy to feature Cleo today. I have also had the opportunity to play a Korg Rhymth 55 in the past, at the Vintage Synthesizer Museum. A bit in the instrument from Vintage Synth Explorer:

he KR55 was, for its time (1979), an advanced preset rhythm drum machine with up to 96 preset rhythm patterns! These patterns cover the whole gamut of presets (Waltz, Samba, Rhumba, Bossa Nova, Tango, Slow Rock, Swing, Rock, etc.). The KR55 also featured a “swing beat” control to add a variation to the groove. Each drum sound’s level can be individually adjusted for each pattern. It can also be externally controlled via footswitch jack for the Start/Stop and Intro/Fill switches. The KR55B was a black-chassis version released a few years later in 1982 with twice as many rhythm patterns. It has been used by Jean-Michel Jarre, Trio and Depeche Mode.

https://www.vintagesynth.com/korg/kr55.php

Stay at home concert #30 (Ambient / Berlin School Session)

That is one patient cat! Just chilling in the corner for the entire concert.

I also quite like the combination of instruments: vintage Juno-60 and Oberheim Xpander synthesizers along with the newer Arturia MicroFreq, Sequential Rev2, Moog Sub37, and more.

By Martin St├╝rtzer on YouTube, via matrixsynth.

“It is time for another Ambient / Berlin School session! I prepared three long tracks with pads and sequences from the Oberheim Xpander, Waldorf Iridium, Roland Juno-60, Sequential Rev2, Moog Sub37, Arturia Microfreak and my modular system. All sounds are midi sequenced from Ableton. FX are coming from U-He Colour Copy, NI Raum. The Rev2 is connected to Strymon Timeline and Eventide H9. My Juno-60 is clocked from Ableton ‘CV Tools’ through an audio output of the RME 802. I am playing the Arpeggiator and hope to have a proper midi interface for it next time.”

Willow with Roland V Synth

The lovely Willow joins us again, this time showing of a Roland V Synth. From puxflux via Instagram.

You can see Willow’s previous appearance here.

The Roland V Synth was, and is, a powerful instrument that combined many of Roland’s synthesizer technologies in a programmable and playable package. Most intriguing were the formant synthesis and processing capabilities (at least from my perspective).

Simba and Roland Juno Gi

A beautiful black-and-white photo featuring Simba atop a Roland JUNO Gi synthesizer. From anas_ayasso on Instagram.

The JUNO Gi is a recent addition to the JUNO line, a bit different from the original 6/60/106 line. It is a digital synthesizer that can create a wide range of sounds, and it has its own built-in 8-track digital recorder.

Lola and Roland MC-202 Rhythm Composer

Lola (the calico cat) is inspecting a Roland MC-202 rhythm composer. From exfade_electronics via Instagram.

More accent? Lola (the cat) probably has a better grasp of the sequencer than I do!

The MC-202 was among Roland’s first grooveboxes. It has a synthesizer architecture (and visual look) similar to the original SH-101, but also looked ahead to the TB-303.

Primus and Roland TR-808

Primus the cat sits on top of a Roland TR-808 drum machine.

Primus programs a classic Roland TR-808. From Gunfire H. Horibly via our Facebook page.

The TR-808, or simple the 808 as it is affectionately known, was not an initial commercial success. It was only in production from 1980 to 1982 And its sounds were not particularly realistic, but it did have a distinct character than some artists of the time. It has since achieved a cult following and can be heard on more recordings than perhaps any other drum machine. Roland has also released two “reboots” in recent years, a “Boutique” TR-08 version and the TR-8s for the Aira series.